Thursday, April 3, 2014

Mexico pseudo-diary Part Deux

Quite often I've found myself torturing my brain with unanswerable questions: Why did my dad die so young? Why can't I sneeze with my eyes open? Why do I wake up naturally every morning exactly at 5:53? Why do I get one ugly black hair that not even laser seem to be able to kill on my chin every month? And lately I've asked myself multiple times: How (and why!) did I end up living in Philadelphia away from my family, friends, and the life that I've build in NYC for the past fourteen years? 

I'm one of those persons that seems to have mastered the art of riding life's wave with relatively easiness. I like to call myself a professional life surfer. I have no idea what's going to happen tomorrow, 99.9% of the time I don't have a plan, and basically I try not to worry about anything. I just wait for the wave to take me places. This might sound like an ideal life philosophy but the truth of the matter is that I envy people that have a plan. I was once asked by my therapist (you don't call yourself a real New Yorker until you get your own therapist a.k.a. a "friend" that charges $250 an hour for listening to your shit and keeping a straight face all most of the time) where do I see myself in five, ten, and twenty years. I freaked out. I was sent home with a note pad and a pencil and I was told not to come back until a detailed plan for the next twenty years of my physical existence in this planet was written down. Needless to say, I never saw that man again. 

So here we are, three girls in Tulum, Mexico in a beautiful hotel, drinking Margaritas and trying to figure out our very different yet very similar lives. Trusting our internal GPS i.e. gut feeling, sixth sense, voices in my head, imaginary friend with our most important decisions and basically not coming to any conclusion but to ride the wave and enjoy it as it comes. We finished our trip as clueless as we started it but with the firm believe that we are in this world to be happy not in five, ten or twenty years but today. 

Philadelphia, city of brotherly love, thanks for adopting me as one of your bastard offsprings. After six months of walking your streets, nearly being run over by a truck, falling down a flight of stairs and eating the freshest food I've had in the US (sorry NYC, Philly's restaurants rock!) I'm starting to understand why I'm here; I can't quite put in words yet, but the surfing conditions have never been better. 

With love,
Gloria

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Mexico Diary Part I (aka what I vaguely remember from my vacation)

I arrived to Mexico on a Friday afternoon. After a very rough winter I very hesitantly adventured myself to the outdoors of the airport in search of my shuttle taxi. My skin cannot believe that only one layer of clothing can protect me from the weather. I haven't felt these pleasurable temperatures in months. Nine other tourists wait with me patiently in line. We are all pale as milk, damn you winter, damn you to hell!

I spent the afternoon drinking agua de coco by the pool and talking to the very nice bartender. It's surprising to see how happier people seem in more tropical climates. Is the snow turning us into unhappy hermits? I refuse to accept that. I (heart) my snowboard!

My crazy party days are gone (shame!) and now I enjoy the quietness and tranquility of small hotels, this time however I went a little too small and by seven o'clock in the afternoon I found myself having dinner with the hotel staff in the kitchen watching what for me was the best tv show on earth: El Chavo del Ocho. You know what's better than El Chavo del Ocho? Watching El Chavo del Ocho in Mexico, with Mexicans. Life is good. 

My beautiful friends arrived mid-day and from that exact moment a delicious non-stop cycle of sun, laughter, some exercise, shopping (more shame), eating tortilla with guacamole, drinking wine, sleeping, exploring, repeat started. And then came Tulum.....

Monday, March 24, 2014

Synchronicities

From "The Spontaneous Fulfillment of Desire" by Deepak Chopra. © 2003 by Deepak Chopra. 


Most of us go through life a little afraid, a little nervous, a little excited. We are like children playing hide and seek, wanting to be found, yet hoping we won’t be, biting our nails with anticipation. We worry when opportunity approaches a little too closely, and hide deeper in the shadows when fear overcomes us. This is no way to go through life. People who understand the true nature of reality, those whom some traditions call enlightened, lose all sense of fear or concern. All worry disappears. Once you understand the way life really works—the flow of energy, information, and intelligence that directs every moment—then you begin to see the amazing potential in that moment. Mundane things just don’t bother you anymore. You become lighthearted and full of joy. You also begin to encounter more and more coincidences in your life. 


When you live your life with an appreciation of coincidences and their meanings, you connect with the underlying field of infinite possibilities. This is when the magic begins. This is a state I call synchrodestiny, in which it becomes possible to achieve the spontaneous fulfillment of our every desire. Synchrodestiny requires gaining access to a place deep within yourself, while at the same time awakening to the intricate dance of coincidences out in the physical world. When a coincidence arises, don’t ignore it. Ask yourself, What is the message here? What is the significance of this? You don’t need to go digging for the answers. Ask the question, and the answers will emerge. They may arrive as a sudden insight, a spontaneous creative experience, or they may be something very different. Perhaps you will meet a person who is somehow related to the coincidence that occurred. An encounter, a relationship, a chance meeting, a situation, a circumstance will immediately give you a clue to its meaning. “Oh, so that’s what it was all about!” The key is to pay attention and inquire....
Tulum, Mexico. Mayan Ruins.
Clowns brought to you by the universe and it's wonderful synchronicities.